Archive for November, 2009

Koko-en

Friday, November 13th, 2009
 Koko en

We walked over to the adjacent gardens at Koko-en.

favicon Koko en

Leaving Himeji-jo

Monday, November 9th, 2009
 Leaving Himeji jo

We waited in line for literally hours to get to the top. It was of course very cool but the waiting was buzzkill. I think I may have take more photos, in fact, I’m quite sure I took more photos of this place but they are not developed yet. After we visited the castle, we visited the adjacent gardens.

FYI: Himeji-jo

favicon Leaving Himeji jo

王の屋根の下で

Sunday, November 8th, 2009
 王の屋根の下で

 王の屋根の下で

 王の屋根の下で

Under the roof of a king…

favicon 王の屋根の下で

The Tourists

Sunday, November 8th, 2009
 The Tourists

We made it up to Himeji Castle and took the classic tourist shot. It was one of those, “Excuse me, would you please take our photo.” I always hand pick these folks, I won’t just ask anybody, but it just goes to show that you can’t judge a book by its cover because despite handing this guy a simply point and shoot camera, with all the settings right, he still managed to completely botch it. I cropped the hell outta this to get the frame I wanted in the first place, hence the super lo-fi. More Himeji photos to come…

favicon The Tourists

Kobe to Himeji

Thursday, November 5th, 2009
 Kobe to Himeji

 Kobe to Himeji

 Kobe to Himeji

via JR Sanyo line

favicon Kobe to Himeji

Kobe Mosque

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009
 Kobe Mosque

Kobe Mosque was founded in October, 1935 in Kobe and is Japan’s first mosque. The mosque was confiscated by the Imperial Japanese Navy in 1943. However, it continues to function as mosque today. It is located also in the Kitano-cho foreign district of Kobe. Owing to its basement and structure, the mosque was able to endure through the Great Hanshin earthquake.

The mosque was built in traditional Turkish style by the Czech architect Jan Josef Švagr (1885–1969), the architect of a number of Western religious buildings throughout Japan.

favicon Kobe Mosque

Ben’s house

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009
 Bens house

Then we walked over to the Kitano Ijinkan which is a historical district in Kobe and contains a number of foreign residences from the late Meiji and early Taishō eras. This was the house of “Ben” who was an English hunter rare and big game animals a huge polar bear and a moose which are displayed inside.

favicon Bens house

Ikuta Shrine

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009
 Ikuta Shrine

The next morning we started off at Ikuta Shrine. The Shinto shrine is located in the Chūō Ward of Kobe, Japan, and is possibly among the oldest shrines in the country.

According to Nihon Shoki, it was founded by the Empress Jingū at the beginning of the 3rd century AD to enshrine the Kami Wakahirume, and was used as the base for a festival welcoming warriors back from the latest attempt to invade Korea. It now apparently carries a reputation of being a place at which NOT to marry as many famous Japanese couples who have been married here have since divorced.

favicon Ikuta Shrine